September 11 – October 11, 2020 | Scott Greene and Walter Robinson: Herd Immunity

Walter Robinson - Imp

Walter Robinson – Imp

This is not the first time we have paired Scott Greene and Walter Robinson. This exhibition Herd Immunity, however, is certainly the most opportune. The term itself horrendously clinical and also brilliantly poetic in that the divide between the immune majority and the vulnerable minority is the very thing that protects them all. The idea of a divide runs strong through both artists’ practices. Practically, Scott is a painter and printmaker; Walter is a maker of objects. Scott paints a vision of nature’s relationship with people. Walter uses natural materials like leather and hand-harvested wood to look back on our planet’s humans. Both artists are obsessed with our collective yet divided domestic moment. Who has power and who does not? What do people do with power? Is it us versus them, or us versus us, or them versus them?

One of the major through-lines of history is the gradual enfranchisement of “We the People.” The fact that artists like Scott and Walter can paint and sculpt whatever they want is a testament to that. Their work is also a testament to this process of devolution still being at work right now. That we are living through a global pandemic feels undeniable, yet there are plenty of powerful people who are writing a separate history where numbers are not to be trusted, where demonstrable falsehoods are believed, and where a set of imagined and shared national truths do not exist.

It makes perfect sense that by painting and sculpting, Scott and Walter are making objects that are tangible and cannot be denied. There is no function of the herd where it emphatically states that the work of sculpture that everyone sees is somehow not real. Scott Greene’s painting “Deluge” is inspired by a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci. Only now is this drawing realized as a great swirling mass of plastic and cast-off possessions in color: today’s version of a tempest. Walter Robinson’s hanging sculpture “Coronavirus” looks almost like a child’s toy, and, in fact, it glows in the dark! Their artwork is undeniably powerful, technically brilliant, and very, very real.

View works in the exhibition here.

Visits to the opening will be staggered to adhere to capacity rules and to help maintain the health and safety of everyone. Reservations for a 15-minute arrival window can be made at the bottom of the page.

Scott Greene in “Currency” at 516 Arts Reviewed in Fabrik Magazine

Scott Greene in "Currency" at 516 Arts

Scott Greene is featured in the Fabrik Magazine review of “Currency: What Do You Value” at 516 Arts in Albuquerque. Perfect fodder for Turner Carroll favorite writer Wesley Pulkka, the review moves in gigantic sweeps referencing Toho Studio’s 1961 B-movie sci-fi thriller “Mothra” through to the “derivatives market, currently valued at one point four quadrillion dollars.” About Greene Pulkka writes “Greene is a truth-telling environmentalist who (to paraphrase Bob Dylan) can paint the rubber off the tire and scare the bird off the wire.”

The exhibition runs November 17, 2018 through February 23, 2019.

19 February 2019

Press for Scott Greene

Scott Greene - Mountsanto

Scott Greene – Mountsanto

Turner Carroll and Scott Greene garnered great press for his exhibition Environmental (Ex)change that runs through November 2018.  Presented alongside the 516 Arts exhibition “Currency: What Do You Value?” that includes a new major painting by Scott Greene. The 516 Arts exhibition is on view from November 17, 2018 to January 26, 2019. THE Magazine recommended both exhibitons in their 5 x 5 Weekly Dispatch.

Scott also had a nice write up in the Santa Fe Arts Journal, and a great article on the “Currency” exhibition with bits on Scott Greene in the Albuquerque Journal.

20 November 2018

November 9 – 30, 2018 | Scott Greene: Environmental (Ex)change

November 9-30, 2018

Opening Reception Friday, November 9, 5-7pm
Scott Greene’s paintings are bold and thoroughly relevant. Greene has always been known as a social commentator, using art historical iconography to signify human impact on the natural world. He has been described as a neo-Romantic painter, in that his painting style is nothing short of dreamy. His palette and his handling of paint rival that of European Old Masters. In a bait and switch type tactic, Greene lures the viewer into his works with their lush paint surface and beauty; the viewer then finds him/herself inside an otherworldly socio-political conundrum they are compelled to explore before leaving.

Greene has created a wholly new, scathing, ironic, sublimely beautiful body of work in response to the political divide around issues such as climate change, immigration, and basic human rights. The imagery is centered on a circus theme—apropos of our current society. One painting features a circus “tableau wagon,” painted with images of Mexican children separated from their families. Another painting depicts a locomotive hurling itself forward through a red, menacing sea upon which floats a red, white, and blue basketball. Clowns pile high upon a tiny clown car in yet another work.

Scott Greene writes about his newest body of work: “This is an intense time to be a painter of my sort. Nothing seems too ridiculous, all stories pale to reality. So this work is emotionally driven by extreme shifts to everything we know about being American citizens, whatever that is now. Clown cars, runaway locomotives, quaint cruelty on the prairie, all part of the illusion of power—the farce we now perform in.”
Greene’s career trajectory is just as bold as his subject matter. In just the last three years, Greene’s paintings have been exhibited in major museums throughout New Mexico including the Las Cruces Museum of Art, The Albuquerque Museum of Art, New Mexico Museum of Art, the Anderson Museum of Contemporary Art, and 516 Arts—Albuquerque’s Contemporary Museum. PBS aired a television special featuring Scott’s paintings and an interview about his artistic process and philosophy, in the fall of 2017.

This exhibition at Turner Carroll is held in conjunction with “Currency” at 516 Arts, Albuquerque’s contemporary art museum. “Currency,” curated by Dr. Josie Lopez, “examines the relationship between art and money by exploring the flaws of our current economic reality. Literary critic and philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin described the concept of Carnival as a subversive, disruptive, world-upside-down event in which the hypocrisy of everyday life was unmasked. During Carnival, social structures including those that defined class and status were disrupted by common people.”

Scott Greene began his art school education at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, California, and received his B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute and his M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. Adopting the language and finish of classical painting, Greene often uses the composition of a historical work as a matrix for making a painting that humorously examines the relationship between politics, nature and culture.

In addition to New Mexico museums, Greene’s work has been included in exhibitions internationally and throughout the United States, including non-profit and museum shows at the Schneider Art Museum, the Palo Alto Art Center, the Triton Museum, the Arnot Museum of Art, and the Austin Museum of Art. Greene is the recipient of a Juror Selection Award from the Lubbock Fine Arts Center, and an Art Matters Fellowship. He completed a residency at the Roswell Museum in New Mexico and has works in the public collections of the Anderson Museum of Contemporary Art in Roswell and the McKesson Corporation in San Francisco. Greene’s work was recently featured in Environmental Impact, a traveling exhibition originating at Canton Museum of Art in Ohio.

Work in the exhibition may be viewed here.

For more information and high resolution images, please visit https://www.turnercarrollgallery.com/press-area/ or info@turnercarrollgallery.com

Scott Greene on PBS and in High Fructose

Scott Greene - Colores 20 January 2018

Scott Greene – Colores 20 January 2018

Not long after entering the permanent collection of the Albuquerque Museum, Scott Greene was featured on PBS and in High Fructose Magazine. Interviewed by Hakim Bellamy for the NM PBS program ¡Colores!, Scott and Hakim go in to the weeds on what makes Scott tick. You may see the interview here.

In the piece “Scott M. Greene’s Surreal, Multi-Sourced Paintings” Andy Smith writes “Scott M. Greene’s surreal oil paintings explore several aspects of the Western experience: politics, pop culture, our relationship to the natural world, and the history of art itself. The artist says that the meaning of each work remains elusive for even him until some time has passed with the work, often not working with a complete idea and instead building one idea onto another.”

21 February 2018

Scott Greene Enters Permanent Collection of Albuquerque Museum

Scott Greene - La Bajada Bluff

Scott Greene – La Bajada Bluff

We are very pleased to announce that Scott Greene’s painting “La Bajada Bluff” has entered the permanent collection of the Albuquerque Museum. This important work was in a number of museum exhibitions. It now has a new home at the Albuquerque Museum thanks to curator Andrew Connors. The museum plans to exhibit “La Bajada Bluff” this summer 2018.

10 January 2018

New American Paintings

Scott Greene, Deluge

Scott Greene, Deluge

The monsoon season is late in coming this summer, but the rains are finally upon us. Scott Greene (NAP # 18, #30, #54, #66, #78, #96, #108) has been imagining this deluge for some months, as he works on a large painting in his studio just north of ABQ. His work is shown with regular frequency in San Francisco, to the point where it might be easy to think of him as a Bay Area artist, but he has been rooted in New Mexico since completing his MFA in painting from the University of New Mexico. – Diana Gaston, New Mexico Contributor

 

Scott Greene Review in Visual Art Source

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Visual Art Source

We are very proud to announce that Scott Greene’s Turner Carroll exhibition “The Course of Empire” was chosen by Visual Art Source as one of the best shows in the country by reviewer Jordan Eddy. This comes after Scott’s Museum of New Mexico Alcove Exhibition in March 2016, and his stellar 516 Arts exhibition “Bewilderness” in Albuquerque this past winter.

A link to the VAS review is here.

April 14 – 17, 2016 | Turner Carroll at the Dallas Art Fair

Dallas Art Fair

Dallas Art Fair

Located at the Fashion Industry Gallery, adjacent to the Dallas Museum of Art in the revitalized downtown arts district. Featuring new works by gallery artists Fausto Fernandez, Hung Liu, Squeak Carnwath, Drew Tal, Jamie Brunson, Rusty Scruby, Edward Lentsch, Wanxin Zhang, Suzanne Sbarge, Karen Yank, Scott Greene, Holly Roberts, and more! Fair hours are Friday and Saturday, April 15 and 16 respectively, from 11am to 7pm, and Sunday, April 17 from 12pm to 6pm, with an opening preview gala Thursday, April 14.

A link to the Dallas Art Fair is here.

Santa Fe New Mexican on Scott Greene at MoNM Alcove Show

Scott Greene

In a great article in the March 11, 2016 Santa Fe, New Mexican, Michael Abatemarco gives us a superb review of the Museum of New Mexico Alcove Show 16/17.1, and Scott Greene‘s place in the exhibition.

Abatemarco writes, “In the 2013 painting La Bajada Bluff, Scott Greene depicts a bison driven over the edge of a cliff, a historic means of slaughtering buffalo that was used by Native tribes. But Greene’s buffalo has been pushed over by the detritus of modern society, not by hunters, crowded out by a towering mountain of barrels, pipes, discarded electronics, abandoned mobile homes, and other trash that’s become the foundation on which civilization rests. ‘The idea for that painting came from a landfill that’s not too far away; I live in Bernalillo,’ Greene told Pasatiempo. ‘It’s an older landfill. It’s a compaction of stuff that’s been here for a long time. The image was inspired by hiking around and looking at archaeological depositions where you have deposits of different matter that are all compacted together. I started thinking, ‘What are the depositions that we’re creating?’ You’re seeing this bluff that’s sheared away and you see all the stuff that we’re layering up.’ ”

A copy of the article is here.

Mar 4 – Apr 24, 2016 | Scott Greene: The Course of Empire

sgr_untitled72

Scott Greene’s gorgeous, prophetic, paintings explore the sublime beauty of the human/nature interaction. With lush surfaces rivaling the greatest painters of art history, Greene tackles issues such as climate change and the environment. This Turner Carroll exhibition is concurrent with Scott’s paintings being featured in Alcoves 16/17 at the New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe.

Gallery comments by Scott Greene Friday, March 11, at 6 pm, Turner Carroll

Opening Reception Friday, March 11, 2016 from 5 to 7pm
[n.b. that this event takes place in Santa Fe]

Scott Greene “Bewilderness” Review in Albuquerque Journal

Scott Greene "Bewilderness" Review - Albuquerque Journal December 2015

Scott Greene “Bewilderness” Review – Albuquerque Journal December 2015

Wesley Pulkka wrote a great piece about Scott Greene on December 20, 2015 for the Albuquerque Journal.  The article highlights Scott’s “first local solo show in the past 20 years titled ‘Bewilderness’ a gob smacking tour-de-force of virtuosity that may lead lessor talents to hang up their brushes.”  The exhibition is at 516 Arts in Albuquerque.

A copy of the article may be seen on the Albuquerque Journal website here.

Scott Greene “Bewilderness” Review in Alibi

Scott Greene "Bewilderness" Review - Alibi - November 2015

Scott Greene “Bewilderness” Review – Alibi – November 2015

In the November 26 to December 2, 2016 edition of the Alibi, Maggie Grimason’s interviews with Beau Carey and Scott Greene describe both painters “canary in the coal mine” approach to painting.  Grimason writes, “Where there is a felt absence in Carey’s paintings, Scott Greene approaches the topic differently, explicitly incorporating man-made detritus into his compositions. ‘I see artificial constructs everywhere and try to include a vestige of what’s natural,’ Greene stated of his works in Bewilderness.”

The exhibitions run parallel at 516 Arts in Albuquerque

A copy of the article may be seen on the Alibi website here.

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